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ICELANDIC CHURCHES IN THE USA AND CANADA
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Thingvalla church Eyford North Dakota USA
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On this page we have added a sample image
of one of the Icelandic church in the USA
and a brief history
Markerville the home of Stephan G. Stephansson
markerville.jpg
The only Icelandic church in Alberta

The Icelandic Lutheran Church at Markerville

The Markerville Lutheran Church is the only Icelandic Lutheran church built in Alberta, in fact the only Icelandic church in Alberta. Markerville is located about half way between the Cities of Calgary and Edmonton in Alberta. The village was built along the banks of the Medicine River. The original name of the community was Tindastoll.

The Icelandic district at Markerville was really two subdistricts, Hola in the north and Tindastoll in the south that were located very close together. The first settlers arrived in 1888. They were primarily from North Dakota. Among these settlers was Stephan G. Stephansson a famous and respected poet who remained in the community until his death in August of 1927.

The Lutheran congregation at Markerville was officially organized on 30 January 1900 and joined the Icelandic Synod the same year on 15 November 1900. They built their church by volunteer labor beginning in 1906 and completing it 25 May 1907. The foundation was of local sandstone. The bell tower and bell were added later.

The church held fairly regular services until 1963 when the last regular worship service was held. Since then the church has been used only for special services such as Christmas and Easter, and for weddings and funeral ceremonies. The church has been maintained over the years since 1963 by Vonin, a very dedicated Icelandic womens organization.

The one other Lutheran congregation organized in Alberta was in Edmonton. This group organized in August of 1906 and joined the Synod the next year. They ceased to be a congregation in 1921.